Skip to main content

About your Search

20130211
20130219
STATION
CNN 5
CNNW 5
FBC 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
MSNBCW 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WETA 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 41
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)
or totally unrelated. this is nasa and there's little ole earth and the asteroid you can see the distance away from us, courtesy of nasa. right now a mere 25,000 miles, six minutes ago before we went on the air, it was at 27,000 miles, going very fast. and so, that's how they have it calculated not going to hit us or graze us, but buzz us in about an hour and ten minutes right here. i hope we live. just kidding. they say it's not going to hit us. not totally true and, but they say there's no 'cause for concern, hello. you never know, do you? and in other news we're following another major story for you today as the president heads to the windy city, his hometown, to deliver what's been billed pass a purely economic address. but there's he a growing sense that the economy will not be the only topic of discussion. this 174 shootings and 44 murders, so far, reported in chicago. that's just by february 3rd alone, all right? so it's going to get worse and it was really bad last year. last year, the city saw 506 murders, and more than 2400 shootings. and what a mess! all this after this 15-year
feet deep. nasa estimates that an object this size approaches earth every 40 years with the likelihood of a strike every 12,000 years. scientists worldwide claim that the mir astronauts were unrelated because of their very different trajectories. the $4 trillion global telecommunications industry is breathing a sigh of relief tonight as that astra crossed over the gm synchronous orbit of more than 1,000 telecommunications and weather satellites without incident. fox news correspondent bill keating has our report. ♪ >> this * is going away. >> reporter: asteroid be a 14 is more than 55,000 miles from earth moving away from us not to return for decades. this * came very close to earth in fact another close as astra flyby in recorded history. 17,000 miles. in the world is down -- astronomers response on predicting we would all be fine from the century, now worth impact. at least not this time. there are an estimated one millions base rocks near earth orbit. >> we have seen and tracked about 9,000 of them right now. and about 1,000 of them are potentially hazardous. >> and mr. astronomer
of flying glass and debris. tonight we have learned there was no warning. more on that from nasa in a moment. we begin with kirit radia in moscow. >> reporter: it came out of nowhere. a bright speck in the sky, soon streaking across the horizon, followed by an almost apocalyptic scene. a blinding flash of light, and then all hell broke loose. [ explosion ] dizzying explosions, shattering windows, knocking these office workers to the ground. these students were lucky, protected by curtains from the flying glass. and these men barely escaped the blast. [ explosion ] in the streets -- pandemonium. terrified residents thought the world was ending. people started to panic. somebody screamed, the end of the earth, he says. the chaos of the meteor captured on cell phones and the dashboard cameras of cars, so popular here in russia. the blast was so powerful, it knocked down a wall at this factory. in all, over 1,200 people were injured, mostly from broken glass. 3,000 buildings damaged, over a million square feet of glass shattered. many were injured after going to the window to check out the flash
apparently unfounded. nasa is using radar and other technology to study how the asteroid behaves, including its rotation rate, its composition and how it's impacted by the earth's gravity. the idea is to learn enough to prevent cat as it sfroe fee from it threatening in the future. >> we're going to get a lot of information about the asteroid. we're interested in its future motion, whether or not it could come back, whether it threatens the earth. >> reporter: the odds are either this one or another will be back. an asteroid impact the earth about every 120 years on average. it will be visible in the northern hemisphere this evening if you have access to a telescope. for now it's on its way away from the earth out into outer space harmlessly rotating -- or resolving -- excuse me. harmlessly rotating -- i can't even think of the right word. orbiting the sun. harmlessly at least for now, jim. >> casey, thanks very much. we appreciate it. ? or gal lat particular news, a meteor lit up the skies over eastern russia. the blinding light was followed by a series of deafening explosions. listen to t
as an asteroid that came exceedingly close to earth, at least in space terms. as this nasa animation shows, the asteroid was just over 17,000 miles away from earth, traveling at about eight miles per second, actually inside a ring of television and weather satellites that surround the planet. named da-14, the asteroid was half the size of a football field. it passed, we can happily report, without incident. here to tell us about both events is astrophysicist and author neil degrasse tyson, director of the hayden planetarium in new york city. let's start with what happened in russia. how unusual was that in terms of size and impact? >> well, we couldn't know precisely how common that would be. all we can do is sort of look back at other sort of reported such events. for example, there was an air blast that happened in the airspace over india and pakistan back in 1990s. which happened to occur while they were in intense conversations about their nuclear buildup of arm ament. and so such a blast mimics greatly what would happened with the nuclear blast. it is an instant deposit of energy in t
combined to discover. it'll do that every month. >> watch more on former nasa astronaut ed lue and his urgent mission to save planet earth. this sunday on the next list. with so much competition, finding the right job is never easy. but with the nation's largest alumni network, including those in key hiring positions, university of phoenix can help connect you to a world of opportunity. [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...people noticed. ♪ the all-new cadillac ats -- 2013 north american car of the year. ♪ for a limited time, take advantage of this exceptional offer on the all-new cadillac ats. a hairline fracture to the mandible and contusions to the metacarpus. what do you see? um, i see a duck. be more specific. i see the aflac duck. i see the aflac duck out of work and not making any money. i see him moving in with his parents and selling bootleg dvds out of the back of a van. dude, that's your life. remember, aflac will give him cash to help cover his rent, car payments and keep everything as normal a
: how much warning do we get? >> nasa tracks these things. they're able to track 90% of the asteroids that could come close to us. but in this case, there was really no warning. people don't know what's going on. >> brian: i remember in the video game, you could shoot an asteroid out of the sky. i know in armageddon, in the movies, bruce willis and ben affleck were able to -- who else was in that? were able to stop it. is that what we're going to have to do at some point? >> nasa does track these things and they have the capability to stop them before they come close to earth. >> brian: lasers? >> all sorts of things. >> steve: there has been a nasa plan to send some sort of ship onto an asteroid, but once again, the asteroid that's going to come between us and some of our satellites later today, that's going to be far away, right? >> it's relatively close. the closest they've come in centuries. so that's why people are a little nervous. but no, it's not going to hit us. >> alisyn: let us know if there is ever one coming, all right? >> brian: even if we're in sports or in an interview
scientists can see cosmic rocks coming our way, doing something about it is the tricky part. in theory, nasa would be able to knock a threatening incoming asteroid off orbit so it misses earth. but there's very little precedent for that. the only thing that comes close was a 2005 mission where nasa steered a probe about the size of a coffee table into an oncoming docket, a project known as -- comet, a prooj knoject kn "deep comet." >> with the they're tess should work fine, certainly there would be details in launching a massive object into space, making sure we guide it correctly so it will hit the right spot on the asteroid to knock it appropriately off-course. >> reporter: scientists say these events, the meteor in russia and the asteroid's close call, should be a wake-up call. if the asteroid instead of missing earth had impacted, say, washington, d.c., it would have been devastating. >> if it's dense enough and could hit the earth intact, the impact crater itself would not be that big. but the effects from the shockwave and the heat from impact would be enough to basically wipe out ever
the second. >> the project pre sently received 5 million in funding from nasa. one in russia insisted it was not a meteor, but john considerry a new weapons of mass destruction from texas in the united states. one of president obama's favorite spots to grab a bit. ray's hell burger, reportedly owes overdue rent and court fees and a second location closed for business and president obama has visited the spot with vice-president biden and russian president med investiga med did he ha med-- >> and how does he stay so-- >> those restaurants are popular in northern virginia, it's hard to believe. >> clayton: have you even at ray's hell burger. >> tucker: i don't, but the traffic. always packed. >> clayton: and how do you have $39,000 in back rent to pay? if they're lining out the door. let's talk about a new census bureau study revealing what it means to be middle class. certainly obviously during the campaign we hear the term middle class, both sides playing to try to the middle class. the president during his state of the union used middle class eight times, but what does it mean? here i
? >> nasa has a program to search for these objects and we've done a good job at finding the large ones. we put the priority on finding the large one first. the one that hit on friday was really a tiny asteroid, pretty small. >> anna: it's wild that this tiny one caused this much damage. you say mostly what you're looking for are the ones that are 400 feet in size and up, right? >> yes. a city block and larger. those are ones that would reach the surface. the one that hit over russia was broken up by the atmosphere. so there was only the damage from the shock wave. the larger ones, if they reach the surface in one piece, can cause great damage. >> peter: when you talk about the larger ones, what are we talking about? something as big as a kilometer? do those exist? >> oh, yes. oh, yes. and that's about a half mile. nasa has done a good job of finding 95% of those ones. the idea is to find them many, many years before they could hit the earth and calculate when and where the hazard is and if there is a hazard sometime in the future, then we could possibly do something about it. >> steve: now
was exhilaratinexh, he was about to take off in another gear. >> nasa a looking for the next batch of the astronauts. >> specifically african-americans, what did you think your chances were. >> i didn't think my chances were very high. >> with nearly 10,000 applicants competing for just 35 flights, his chances were slim, but guy was one of three african-american astronauts, made it through. so, what kind of personality makes it into space? >> well, you have to be a person that can get along with a the lot of different people, but you also have to be a team player. >> were you anxious? >> i was excited about flying so i think we were well portrayed. interestingly enough when you rocket into space, it's almost like riding a simulator. the simulations are so good in the ground almost like you've been there before. >> harris: now you find out your mission has been moved up and you're actually going to be the first african-american in space. what goes through your mind? >> well, i was just excited about flying. but i also recognized the importance of the role that i was going to play and my goal was to d
-wide asteroid heading for earth. here's an image of the asteroid from nasa when it was more than 450,000 miles from earth. tom foreman has the details on how close it will get. >> let's get reference points. we talk about the earth many of us like to think the moon is close to us but the moon is not as close as you think. it's almost a quarter million miles away so what is close in space in satellites, we've been launching these for decades and filled the sky. some are fairly low, others quite high. the highest are communications and gps satellites, about 22,000 miles up in the air. where is this asteroid going to be? it is going to shoot out of the sky and cut right through the top of the satellite belt, at about 17,000 miles. >> an awful lot going on in the skies right now so we're joined by bill nye the science guy, is he in los angeles. bill, the meteor shower in russia, the ast noid some 17,000 miles away, i think everyone really has two questions here, first of all, is there a connection here and is there a difference between a meteor shower and an asteroid? help us out. >> oh, yeah, yea
? nasa says it was likely a meteor. not a space rock that streaked across skies over russia where 1,000 are recovering from injuries. the damage estimate for that, $33 million. and that happened on the same day that an asteroid half the size of a football field did a drive-by, passing 17,000 miles above earth. dr. hakin oleshegy is a scientist at the florida institute of technology and spokesperson for the science channel. nice to have you with us this morning. >> good morning. i'm happy to be here. >> first we need to clear up a few thing. initially we were calling that space rock in russia a meteorite. but it actually of an asteroid as well as the other one. >> well, you know, the naming of these rocks is kind of interesting, right? this object originated in the asteroid belt, so it is an asteroid. when it became streaking through our skies, we call it a meteor. then when it became a fireball, we called it a bolide. when the part hit the ground, fragments, we call those meteorites. >> i think i followed all that. >> yeah. >> you started off with the fact that it came from the aste
million mission is managed by nasa and the u.s. geological survey. >> similolorlar energy >> consider some of the claim is available, but makers of solar panels are dealing with had asa hazardous waste problem. >> state records show that 44 manufacturing facilities in california produced 46.5 million lbs. of hazardous waste from 2007 to the first half of 2011. roughly 97 percent of it was taken to in-state waste still is, but more than 1.4 million lbs. was transported out of state. >> the number of cases of asthma in children is on the rise across them cross country. nearly one in 10 children now suffer from the disease. here in the bay area so the highest concentrations of as much are the same areas where pollution concerns are the highest. in alameda county, the as my escalation rate is nearly twice the state average and the third highest in california. >> three people were killed in a helicopter crash while filming for discovery channel show a loss angeles county. it happened early yesterday at polsa rows of red and city of acton. >> authorities say all three people died aboard the heli
anywhere. >> reporter: the yearly catch is shipped to nasa's johnson space center. here in the non-december crypt building number 31... >> this is the air shower. reporter: ... where you have to suit up to protect the meteorites from contamination. the precious cargo is unpacked and catalogued under the watchful eye of curator kevin rider. >> they're frozen from the time they're collected and returned all the way along the legs of the journey to get to houston. >> reporter: each sample is carefully examined and given a name based on where it was found. so we get to see a martian meteorite. >> this sample is elephant morain 79001. it's a basaltic rock from mars. >> reporter: it was studying a martian meteorite found in antarctica that led scientists to the discovery that there was once water on mars. and those these ugly ducklings may all look similar to the naked eye each meteorite has different chemical and mineral content. under a polarizing microscope, there is beautiful... they're as beautiful as stained glass windows for it's what they may some day tell us that really matters.
.s.-based telescopes to get a good look. but in australia some imagery is available and coming in thanks to nasa. as for a direct hit, well, astronomers worldwide are watching, they're excited but not worried. this asteroid's about half a football field long or roughly the size of a 12-story building like this. that certainly is big enough to wipe out a city, but scientists say at least today that is not going to happen. the real threat, though small, is to communications satellites like the ones we at fox news use. the geosynchronous plane is 22,000 miles around the earth, and da14 penetrates at 1:24 eastern, just a little more than an hour from now, coming 17,000 miles from earth, exiting at 3:24. satellite companies have been warned. they do not expect any satellite will actually be hit though. with about a million asteroids and meteors flying around earth's orbit, astronomers and telescopes around the planet are constantly looking up. >> we've seen and trackedded about 9,000 of them right now, and about a thousand of them are potentially hazardous. so we look at those carefully, and it turns
her last words. her nasa good-bye. >> i take with me so many amazing memories and things that are in here, that are in here. i will treasurer forever. i'm going to miss you all so much. i love you very, very much. >> oh, dear. imagine you have family and her friends and you watch this, and it's going to be on air for the next nine weeks. some people argue here this reality show continuing to air this footage of reeva is in poor taste. others say it's just a fitting tribute. back to you. >> and her family supported it as well. thank you. appreciate it. the update on that tremendously complicated case. >>> a two-alarm fire at a recycling company in tampa, florida. they believe a pile of scrap metal caught on fire, but they don't know how. they plan to use foam to put out the flames and later they will use a bulldozer to try to move the scrap metal. >>> we have learned an aerospace executive has been fired after he allegedly slapped a crying toddler on a delta flight from minneapolis to atlanta. the company who employed 60-year-old joe hundley called his behavior offensive a
saw something strange in the sky last night, a streaking flash of light. nasa tells us it could have been another meteor or some sort of space debris burning up as it entered the atmosphere. fortunately, nobody was hurt in california. >>> some new details about christopher dorner's last moments. an autopsy showed the former l.a. cop died of a single gunshot to the head. they say at this point it looks like it was self-inflicted. dorner locked himself in a cabin that caught fire during the final standoff with police. >>> a new pope before easter? could pop. pope benedict xvi will step down at the end of the month. current rules make march 15th the earliest possible date to pick a new pope but the vet kat says the date could be pushed up if all of the cardinals make it to rome early for a vote. >>> weary passengers from a carnival cruise ship "triumph" today are adjusting to being back on dry land with running water and working toilets. the passengers finally departed the crippled ship early friday in mobile, alabama, the more than 4,200 passengers and crew were then taken to new orlea
katrina, sandy reshaped the coastline and devastated homes, businesses and lives. nasa says the evidence shows humans are contributing to global warming. still, the realities in washington test the bounds of how we as a nation respond. in his state of the union address, the president told members of congress that if they don't act, he will. >> eye will direct my cabinet to come up with actions we can take to reduce pollution, prepare communities for climate change, and speed the transition to more sustainable sources of energy. >> last year president obama rejected a permit to build the keystone pipeline. but democrats are torn between a base of supporters who strongly oppose the project and the potential business boom by adding thousands of new jobs into the work force. that permit now rests in the hands of the state department, and secretary john kerry, who in august suggested climate change is as dangerous as iran, nuclear weapons, and war. now, on february 8, kerry met with canada's foreign minister, and he promised a fair, transparent and prompt decision on that. i don't know. it's
has been investigating nasa for the past four years. the congressmen say the u.s. attorney's office in northern californ wants to bring criminal charges, but has been blocked by the justice department. the u.s. attorney's office denies that claim. >>> several people are hurt this morning after a police chase ends with a shooting in san francisco. police say a stolen town car tried to get away from officers near the intersection of eddy and jones streets. after a short chase t car swerved on to the sidewalk to avoid spike strips. one officer shot at the car which kept going before crashing into a taxi and two other cars. the suspect is now under arrest, four other people are hurt. >>> we'll take a look at the forecast. >>> 9:28. welcome back. taking a live look at the hills in sunol. beautiful clear sky overhead. we need the rain to keep these hills green and it's on the way. but not before we get to 80 in some places. 45 degrees in san jose, 44 in gilroy. look at santa rosa, they're still at 35 degrees because we had a stubborn pocket of fog that hung out there all day. it's our tur
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)